What New Golfers Need to Know about Golf Shafts

A lot of people in the golf world say that a golf shaft is the club’s engine. This post is focused letting readers know how shafts are made and a number of the common myths on what must be done with shafts.

These days, there are three common kinds of shafts: table-rolled graphite, steel and filament-wound graphite. Although graphite has come a long way since it came into life, stele is still the most dependable and consistent when it comes to controlling direction and distance. That is why people will see most of touring professionals these days tend to play steel shafts in the irons and graphite in the woods. As a material, graphite tends to take a longer time to load when a backswing is made.

Golf Shafts

A golfer’s hands travel a specific distance in a swing and the club head tends to travel about three times farther. A shortened swing means graphite won’t have much time to respond by trying to load itself. Thus, this gets confused as the player transitions into a forward swing. As the shaft is confused, the energy given in it won’t be properly released resulting in the player catching fliers or misdirection. Many golfers who play graphite in their irons find it uneasy to control distance. That is why wedges have steel shafts.

steel shafts

Making of Shafts

Table-rolled graphite shafts are made just what their names suggest. The process involves rolling the graphite the same way a cigar is rolled. After the rolling, there will be vertical storage of the shaft until a certain amount of shafts are produced. When 500 shafts are rolled, these are placed into an oven r kiln for drying. The issue here is that while the first shaft waits to be put into oven/kiln, it’s still wet and being pressured by its own weight. So, it starts to wrap so slightly. Meanwhile, the second shaft warps a bit less. Such warping can result in inconsistent shaft functioning, mishits and misdirection.

Making of Shafts

Steel shafts are made by either rolling a flat steel strip or stretching a solid piece. During the stretching, a solid steel piece is stretched and placed through some squeezing processes to form the shaft’s step. The rolling process involves rolling a flat strip of steel into a tube and welding it. The welding includes fusing two ends together without any second material.

Common Myth

When it comes to fuji golf shafts, a common myth is that spinning will correct all issues. Steel shafts are made with a seam where the shafts are fused. Table-rolled graphite shafts come with a seam where the graphite is rolled. Such seam is the shaft’s weakest part. For many people, spining the shaft and placing the seam in a specific position is helpful in improving the shaft’s performance. Many experts disagree this for some reasons. This is because the seam tends to represent a weak portion of the shaft which will be present regardless of the spot you place it. When a seam is placed at 12 o’clock, the player will be able to control trajectory with their ability to control direction being sacrificed.

Golf Shafts